Van de internationale media

Sprint and Olympic triathlon brick workouts

Triathlon Magazine Canada 1 month 1 week ago

As the tri season approaches, it’s important to practice running off the bike. It doesn’t matter if you do a Sprint, Olympic or Ironman triathlon, these bike-course combinations are very beneficial. It’s a way of getting your body used to running with heavy legs. Also, these sessions can help you determine the power or speed at which you should pace the bike or run. For example, if you’re used to cycling too fast and have no energy running, these sessions will help you realize that by pushing 10-15 watts less on the bike you’re able to run much better.

Related: Les enchaînements vélo-course

Photo: Antoine Desroches

Related: Entraînement pour Ironman Mont Tremblant: Le garage au chalet

The duration of these sessions may vary depending on whether you are training for a sprint triathlon or an Ironman. For a sprint triathlon, it’s best to perform several short-duration sets, but at high-intensity. Generally, to prepare for an Ironman, the sequences will be much longer.

In the run-up to the first race of the ITU CAMTRI America Cup, Pascal Dufresne’s group of athletes did multiple bike-run sessions. Here is the description of the training:

Legend

CP5 = Critical power for 5 min (maximum power during a 5 min test)

Tempo = moderate effort

Session 1

Bike

  • 15 min bike easy
  • 5 min progressive bike
  • 6 x
    • 40 sec @ CP5
    • 40 sec Tempo
    • 30 sec @ CP5 +
    • 30 sec Tempo +
    • 20 sec @ CP5 ++
    • 20 sec Tempo ++
    • 10 sec Fast
    • 2 min easy

Run

  • 1 min @ pace 3000m
  • 1 min @ pace 5000m
  • 1 min rest
  • 30 sec @ pace 2000m
  • 1 min 30 @ pace 5000m
  • 5 min easy

Session 2

Bike

  • 2 x
    • 40 sec @ CP5
    • 40 sec Tempo
    • 30 sec @ CP5 +
    • 30 sec Tempo +
    • 20 sec @ CP5 ++
    • 20 sec tempo ++
    • 10 sec FAST
    • 2 min easy

Run

  • 1 min @ pace 3000 m
  • 1 min @ pace 5000m
  • 1 min rest
  • 30 sec @ pace 2000m
  • 1 min 30 @ pace 5000m
  • 10 min easy

The post Sprint and Olympic triathlon brick workouts appeared first on Triathlon Magazine Canada.

Endurance diet Nutrition thatll improve your staying power

220 triathlon 1 month 1 week ago
Include these in your diet to improve your endurance and stamina so you perform at your best when it matters

How to push yourself beyond your physical limits

220 triathlon 1 month 1 week ago
Swathes of research and realworld accounts have proved that the mind has an inbuilt safety net to stop the body exercising well before its physiological limit But rather than take this lying down studies are also showing that it might be possible to mentally override the heavy breathing burning muscles and onset of fatigue If so then how can we hack our own grey matter and is it wise or indeed safe to do so

Neue Rennserie: Spirit Multisport

Tritime 1 month 1 week ago

Gemeinsam mit drei weiteren prestigeträchtigen Triathlon-Events wird der Eberl Chiemsee Triathlon Teil der neuen europaweiten Triathlon Serie „Spirit Multisport“.

 
Die Serie umfasst vier Triathlon-Events in vier Ländern: Den internationalenTriathlon Portocolom auf Mallorca (Spanien), den TIME Alpe d’Huez-Triathlon (Frankreich), den Trans Vorarlberg Triathlon (Österreich) und den EBERL Chiemsee Triathlon im bayerischen Chiemgau.
Die neue Serie startet im Sommer mit bekannten Profisportlern in ihren Reihen, attraktiven Preisgeldern, internationalen Coaching-Seminaren sowie der Möglichkeit für Altersklassen-Athleten, Punkte in der gesamten Serie zu sammeln. Tom Sutton, Geschäftsführer von Spirit Multisport, meint: „Unser Ziel ist es, eine echte Alternative zu den aktuellen Triathlonangeboten zu bieten – höhere Qualität, einzigartige Rennformate und Distanzen, die die Triathleten im Laufe der Saison planen können. Wir sind sehr stolz darauf, mit Veranstaltungen zusammenzuarbeiten, die seit langem den Ruf von Sicherheit, Fairness und Professionalität haben und eine gemeinsame Vision für die Zukunft des Sports haben.“
Nicola Spirig, Gewinnerin der Olympischen Gold und Silbermedaille ist Mitbegründerin der Serie: „Als jemand, der während meiner gesamten Karriere mit Langstreckensportlern trainiert hat, habe ich immer die harte Arbeit und den Einsatz geschätzt, den Altersklassen- und die Profiathleten benötigen. Wir freuen uns sehr auf die Zusammenarbeit mit Events, die professionell sein werden, aber auch die Grundwerte des Triathlons darstellen, wie Gleichberechtigung und ein guter Lebensstil durch Sport und Spaß daran.“
Eine offizielle Pressekonferenz wird zum Serienstart beim internationalen Triathlon Portocolom im April stattfinden. Dann werden Details zu den wichtigsten Sponsoring- und Partnerschaftsinitiativen veröffentlicht.
weitere Informationen
Text: Pressemitteilung chiemsee-triathlon.com
Foto: Ingo Kutsche | sportfotografie.biz
Gemeinsam mit drei weiteren prestigeträchtigen Triathlon-Events wird der Eberl Chiemsee Triathlon Teil der neuen europaweiten Triathlon Serie „Spirit Multisport“.

 
Die Serie umfasst vier Triathlon-Events in vier Ländern: Den internationalenTriathlon Portocolom auf Mallorca (Spanien), den TIME Alpe d’Huez-Triathlon (Frankreich), den Trans Vorarlberg Triathlon (Österreich) und den EBERL Chiemsee Triathlon im bayerischen Chiemgau.
Die neue Serie startet im Sommer mit bekannten Profisportlern in ihren Reihen, attraktiven Preisgeldern, internationalen Coaching-Seminaren sowie der Möglichkeit für Altersklassen-Athleten, Punkte in der gesamten Serie zu sammeln. Tom Sutton, Geschäftsführer von Spirit Multisport, meint: „Unser Ziel ist es, eine echte Alternative zu den aktuellen Triathlonangeboten zu bieten – höhere Qualität, einzigartige Rennformate und Distanzen, die die Triathleten im Laufe der Saison planen können. Wir sind sehr stolz darauf, mit Veranstaltungen zusammenzuarbeiten, die seit langem den Ruf von Sicherheit, Fairness und Professionalität haben und eine gemeinsame Vision für die Zukunft des Sports haben.“
Nicola Spirig, Gewinnerin der Olympischen Gold und Silbermedaille ist Mitbegründerin der Serie: „Als jemand, der während meiner gesamten Karriere mit Langstreckensportlern trainiert hat, habe ich immer die harte Arbeit und den Einsatz geschätzt, den Altersklassen- und die Profiathleten benötigen. Wir freuen uns sehr auf die Zusammenarbeit mit Events, die professionell sein werden, aber auch die Grundwerte des Triathlons darstellen, wie Gleichberechtigung und ein guter Lebensstil durch Sport und Spaß daran.“
Eine offizielle Pressekonferenz wird zum Serienstart beim internationalen Triathlon Portocolom im April stattfinden. Dann werden Details zu den wichtigsten Sponsoring- und Partnerschaftsinitiativen veröffentlicht.
weitere Informationen
Text: Pressemitteilung chiemsee-triathlon.com
Foto: Ingo Kutsche | sportfotografie.biz

Der Beitrag Neue Rennserie: Spirit Multisport erschien zuerst auf tritime - Leidenschaft verbindet.

Why the 30-minute window following a workout may be a myth

Triathlon Magazine Canada 1 month 1 week ago

— by Anne Francis

Alex Hutchinson, sports science journalist and Canadian Running Magazine contributor, has uncovered some new research that throws the 30-minute window theory about protein and carbohydrate replacement into doubt. It turns out that while the nutrition is definitely important, the strict 30-minute rule might not be. On Feb. 22nd, Hutchinson reported on the research in the Globe and Mail.

For years, athletes have believed that their recovery was significantly compromised if they didn’t consume some protein and carbohydrate within 30 minutes of completing a workout. In the late 1980s, studies showed that glycogen stores rebounded much more quickly when subjects refuelled with carbs right after exertion than when they waited a couple of hours. The same thing seemed to be true for muscle recovery from protein consumption.

Related: Do you consume enough protein?

But more recently, researchers have found issues with the way those earlier studies were carried out. For instance, the control group was given a protein-free placebo. So, if the group that was given 25g of protein right away and again several hours later had greater muscle growth, it could be because they consumed twice as much protein as the group that was given a placebo first and 25g of protein later.

They have also played with other variables, such as consuming 25g of protein before a workout, which seems to be as beneficial as consuming it immediately afterwards, even if the post-workout snack is delayed by several hours. So, it may be that the recovery window is more of an issue if you’re training fasted.

Related: Fasted workouts part of a periodized nutritional approach

So athletes can relax, at least a bit. Especially if they eat before a workout, their recovery is unlikely to be affected if they don’t refuel right away afterwards, though ideally, they’re eating again no more than six hours after their pre-workout meal.

If they’re working out again the same day, they should fuel up as soon as possible after the last workout. But otherwise, over a 24-hour period, it pretty much all evens out, where both carbs and protein are concerned. And as Hutchinson points out, if you simply wait until your next regular meal to refuel, you might avoid having to use expensive and complicated protein formulas.

The post Why the 30-minute window following a workout may be a myth appeared first on Triathlon Magazine Canada.

Cervélo’s New P5

Triathlon Magazine Canada 1 month 1 week ago

“Cervélo is back,” one of the journalists proclaimed a few kilometres into our test ride of Cervélo’s new P5.

Photo: Kevin Mackinnon

“I’m not sure I’d be comfortable saying they’d ever gone anywhere,” I replied. “They still lead the Kona bike count every year. But, I will give you this – they’ve nailed this.”

“This,” of course, is the long-awaited revamp of the P5. Initially launched in 2012, a new version of the P5 has been a long-time coming, for sure. But totally worth the wait. The newest iteration of this super bike is 18 percent lighter than its predecessor, 25 percent stiffer and more aerodynamic, even with the addition of disc brakes.

But what’s possibly even more important, and impressive, about the new P5, is how it performs. This is a “biker’s bike,” one that is an immediate hit with those who enjoy a responsive, reactive ride. You get the best of all possible worlds with the P5 – a super-aero machine that allows you to ride aggressively through corners. It’s a time-trialist’s dream bike, one that will no-doubt earn some impressive results in Grand Tours and cycling world championships. And one that will also be a popular triathlon bike for performance-hungry triathletes.

For those of you who might have argued with that journalist, saying that Cervélo made a big splash with the launch of the P5X a few years ago, you have to understand that the P5 and the P5X actually have different goals in mind. The P5X is designed around all the “stuff” triathletes typically carry with them for long-distance rides. Three round water bottles, lots of gels and bars, etc. The P5X is super-aero with all that stuff, but has the downside of being heavier and, of course, isn’t UCI legal. The P5, on the other hand, starts as a UCI legal bike, albeit one that lots of triathletes will gravitate to. If you’re a triathlete, looking for a super-fast ride and you’re happy to live with a few gels or bars and a round water bottle between your handlebars, possibly another behind your saddle and an aero bottle on your downtube, then you’re likely to gravitate towards the P5. Especially if you’re a rider looking for a bike that will feel good while hammering up hills and speeding through corners.

Photo: Kevin MackinnonPhoto: Kevin Mackinnon

Improved cockpit

One of the most innovative features of the P5X was the super-adjustable cockpit that featured a unique riser that could be raised or lowered by loosening one screw. The new P5 builds on that feature, offering an even simpler adjustable riser. The riser attaches to a sleek, very adjustable aero bar that comes with three different extensions – 30- and 50-degree options along with an S-bend version. The newly designed base bar is 38 cm wide and features Cervélo’s own proprietary grips that are very comfortable and designed to add some aero features, while also providing excellent grip even if your hands get sweaty. Despite being just 38 cm wide, the bars feel really good when you’re climbing and hammering into corners. Cervélo has also designed their own pads for the aero bars, which are very comfortable.

While you don’t get the same diverse fitting options that are available in the P5X, there is still lots of adjustability with the P5 cockpit and, with five sizes available (48, 51, 54, 56, 58), it’s hard to imagine that there are many people who won’t get a great fit on the P5.

Di2 friendly

The bike is designed for easy implementation of Shimano’s Di2 system, with the battery stored in the seat post and the charging port easily accessed through the back of the riser. All the hidden wires only enhance the aero features of the bike. For those who might want to run 1X on the P5, the front derailleur hanger is removable.

Photo: Kevin Mackinnon

Performance improvements

Cervélo had to answer to a number of top-flight cyclists (Tom Dumoulin and the crew at Team Sunweb to name just a few of the World Pro Tour cyclists Cervélo works with) when it came to the design of the new bike, which inspired the engineers to spend a lot of time working on the stiffness of the frame. While you never want a bike to feel like a board underneath you, you do want it to be laterally stiff so all your energy goes into moving you forward. The engineers at Cervélo managed to make the frame stiffer exactly where you want it to be – it’s 22 percent stiffer around the head tube than the old P5, and 26 percent stiffer around the bottom bracket. What that means out on the road is you have a bike that is much more responsive when you’re climbing, or pushing hard on the pedals, and is nothing short of a dream in corners. The bike is noticeably lighter (350 g for frame and fork), too, which makes it even more fun when you have to start climbing.

As we’re seeing more and more these days, the new P5 uses disc brakes, which provide excellent braking performance even in rainy conditions. The industry is moving more and more in the disc-brake direction for that reason, but designing a disc-braked bike that is more aerodynamic offers some challenges. The Cervélo engineers have managed to overcome those challenges, though, offering a bike that provides 17 g less drag than the old P5.

Wheel clearance has become a big deal in the bike world these days, too, as rim and tire widths seem to be getting wider and wider all the time. The new P5 features a whopping 36 mm of wheel clearance, so it’s hard to imagine you’ll have any issues.

Photo: Kevin Mackinnon

Other features

The new seat post in the P5 is lighter than the previous version (which will still fit) and comes with the same behind the saddle bottle mount seen on the P5X. There’s also a Cervélo-designed downtube water bottle that holds 500 ml of liquid and makes the bike more aerodynamic. The “triathlon version” of the P5 also comes with a pair of aero “bento” boxes that Cervélo calls Smartpacks. The Smartpack 100 up front is perfect for wrappers and hides the riser bolt, while the Smartpack 400 will hold gels or bars.

The ride

We’ll have more on the ride quality of the new P5 in our May issue of Triathlon Magazine Canada, but on our one venture out on the bike we were more than a little impressed. The new P5 is a rocket – it’s hard not to want to ride the bike fast. With every pedal stroke you make, it feels like the bike is surging forward. We got to do a bit of climbing on the new bike, too, and it is one of the best-performing TT or tri-bikes we’ve ridden when it comes to climbing and corners like a dream at high speeds through switchbacks and technical terrain.

All of which means next-to-nothing for most triathletes, who spend much of their training time on relatively flat terrain and avoid steep climbs and fast, switch-back-filled descents. Those riders will love the new P5 just as much, though – the new cockpit is extremely comfortable and draws you to an aero position. The bike is super fast in real-world conditions – a group of us journalists got to chase American pro Ben Hoffman for a long descent during our test ride and learned, the hard way, that if we were willing to hurt enough, the P5 was more than enough of a machine to keep up. (It did hurt, though, I promise.)

Related: Ben Hoffman moves over to Cervélo

Suffice it to say that Cervélo has, once again, put itself at the forefront of the super-bike category with the new P5. Even if they never went anywhere, Cervélo is back at the top of their game. The new P5 was certainly worth the wait.

Cervélo P5 Builds:

All come with Smartpack 400, Smartpack 100, Aerobottle 500 and rear hydration mount, Barfly computer mount.

$15,000: DuraAce Di2; Ceramic Speed OSPW/ Chain/ BB; Enve SES5.6 Disc wheels

$9,500: Ultegra Di2; DT Swiss P1800 wheels

$6,000: Frameset

The post Cervélo’s New P5 appeared first on Triathlon Magazine Canada.

Das neue Cervélo P5

Tritime 1 month 1 week ago

Am 5. März präsentierte Cervélo Cycles in Arizona ausgewählten Journalisten das brandneue Triathlon-Zeitfahrrad P5. Cervélo umschreibt es mit zwei Sätzen: „The new P5 was built for one thing: performance. Simply put, our P5 bikes will get you to the finish line, faster.“
 
 
Unter Berücksichtigung der im Straßenradsport einzuhaltenden UCI-Rahmen-Boxen lag das Hauptaugenmerk des gemeinsam mit Triathleten und Zeitfahrern der Pro-Tour-Teams entwickelten P5 darauf, neue Maßstäbe auf den Gebieten der Aerodynamik, des Gewichts und der Tretlager- und Lenkkopf-Steifigkeiten zu setzen. Letztere wurden um 22 Prozent (Lenkkopf) beziehungsweise 26 Prozent (Tretlager) erhöht, bei einem um insgesamt 18 Prozent leichteren Rahmen-Gabel-Set.
Sehr viel Gedanken machten sich die verantwortlichen Entwickler um das Design des Zeitfahrlenkers. Neben der stufenlosen Höhenverstellbarkeit des Auflegers, vergleichbar mit den Einstellmöglichkeiten eines Sattelrohrs – Spacer werden nicht mehr benötigt –, kann der Zeitfahrer und Triathlet zwischen drei Auflegern mit verschiedenen Krümmungen wählen: S Bend, 30o Bend und 50o Bend. Der 380 Millimeter breite Basislenker kann zur besseren Erreichbarkeit der Bremsen an den Ausfallenden um bis zu zwei Zentimeter gekürzt werden. Die Armauflagen können ebenfalls individuell positioniert werden, jedoch liegen die Unterarme unabhängig von der Einstellung vergleichsweise eng beieinander. Die Länge der aus „einem Guss“ bestehenden Ausfallenden kann mittels einer Schraube schnell und einfach angepasst werden. Auch bei der Klemmung der Laufräder ist Cervélo einen neuen Weg gegangen und hat sich eine im Mountainbike gängige Technik zu eigen gemacht: Anstatt eines Schnellspanners wurde eine Steckachse verbaut. Scheibenbremsen – ein Rahmen-Gabel-Set für klassische Felgenbremsen wird nicht unterstützt –, die bei allen Witterungsbedingungen ein optimales Bremsverhalten garantieren, runden das neue P5 ab.

Ausstattungsvarianten Cervélo P5
Cervélo bietet folgende beiden Ausstattungsvarianten und ein Rahmen Gabel-Set inklusive Zeitfahrlenker an:
P5 DURA-ACE Di2: 11.999 Euro
P5 Ultegra Di2: 7.499 Euro

Rahmen Gabel-Set inklusive Zeitfahrlenker: 5.499 Euro

Bereits eine Woche vor der offiziellen Präsentation durfte die tritime-Redaktion das neue P5 bei einer mehrstündigen Testausfahrt unter die Lupe nehmen. Einen ersten ausführlichen Testbericht werden wir zeitnah an dieser Stelle veröffentlichen.
weitere Informationen
Text: Klaus Arendt
Fotos: Cervélo Cycles und Klaus Arendt
Am 5. März präsentierte Cervélo Cycles in Arizona ausgewählten Journalisten das brandneue Triathlon-Zeitfahrrad P5. Cervélo umschreibt es mit zwei Sätzen: „The new P5 was built for one thing: performance. Simply put, our P5 bikes will get you to the finish line, faster.“
 
 
Unter Berücksichtigung der im Straßenradsport einzuhaltenden UCI-Rahmen-Boxen lag das Hauptaugenmerk des gemeinsam mit Triathleten und Zeitfahrern der Pro-Tour-Teams entwickelten P5 darauf, neue Maßstäbe auf den Gebieten der Aerodynamik, des Gewichts und der Tretlager- und Lenkkopf-Steifigkeiten zu setzen. Letztere wurden um 22 Prozent (Lenkkopf) beziehungsweise 26 Prozent (Tretlager) erhöht, bei einem um insgesamt 18 Prozent leichteren Rahmen-Gabel-Set.
Sehr viel Gedanken machten sich die verantwortlichen Entwickler um das Design des Zeitfahrlenkers. Neben der stufenlosen Höhenverstellbarkeit des Auflegers, vergleichbar mit den Einstellmöglichkeiten eines Sattelrohrs – Spacer werden nicht mehr benötigt –, kann der Zeitfahrer und Triathlet zwischen drei Auflegern mit verschiedenen Krümmungen wählen: S Bend, 30o Bend und 50o Bend. Der 380 Millimeter breite Basislenker kann zur besseren Erreichbarkeit der Bremsen an den Ausfallenden um bis zu zwei Zentimeter gekürzt werden. Die Armauflagen können ebenfalls individuell positioniert werden, jedoch liegen die Unterarme unabhängig von der Einstellung vergleichsweise eng beieinander. Die Länge der aus „einem Guss“ bestehenden Ausfallenden kann mittels einer Schraube schnell und einfach angepasst werden. Auch bei der Klemmung der Laufräder ist Cervélo einen neuen Weg gegangen und hat sich eine im Mountainbike gängige Technik zu eigen gemacht: Anstatt eines Schnellspanners wurde eine Steckachse verbaut. Scheibenbremsen – ein Rahmen-Gabel-Set für klassische Felgenbremsen wird nicht unterstützt –, die bei allen Witterungsbedingungen ein optimales Bremsverhalten garantieren, runden das neue P5 ab.

Ausstattungsvarianten Cervélo P5
Cervélo bietet folgende beiden Ausstattungsvarianten und ein Rahmen Gabel-Set inklusive Zeitfahrlenker an:
P5 DURA-ACE Di2: 11.999 Euro
P5 Ultegra Di2: 7.499 Euro

Rahmen Gabel-Set inklusive Zeitfahrlenker: 5.499 Euro

Bereits eine Woche vor der offiziellen Präsentation durfte die tritime-Redaktion das neue P5 bei einer mehrstündigen Testausfahrt unter die Lupe nehmen. Einen ersten ausführlichen Testbericht werden wir zeitnah an dieser Stelle veröffentlichen.
weitere Informationen
Text: Klaus Arendt
Fotos: Cervélo Cycles und Klaus Arendt

Der Beitrag Das neue Cervélo P5 erschien zuerst auf tritime - Leidenschaft verbindet.

Pages