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Mike Reilly’s book: Finding My Voice

Triathlon Magazine Canada 1 month 22 hours ago

— by Helen Powers

Mike Reilly has announced Ironman races for 30 years and his trademark, “You are an Ironman!” is as iconic as the race itself. The anticipation of hearing those words has inspired many athletes and they, in turn, inspire Reilly. In his first book, he shares their stories, details of his dream job, and the mutual love for the sport that brings them together.

Reilly ran his first triathlon in 1980 and his first announcer gig came the year after at a 10K run. Too injured to participate, he was unexpectedly asked to read off names at the finish line. It was totally improvised, but things went well and more announcing jobs came his way for marathons and triathlons.

Mike Reilly chats with Sanders at the finish line of Ironman Arizona 2017.

Reilly enjoyed calling the new sport of triathlon because there was more complexity.

“It was exhilarating and unpredictable, and I considered it part of my job to convey all of that to spectators who were still learning about triathlon,” he writes. “The more they understood, the more exciting it would be for them to watch how a race unfolded.”

At his first Ironman event, Reilly was assisting the announcer in Hawaii when he witnessed the incredible Dick Hoyt competing in the Ironman with his quadriplegic son, Rick.

“Being down at the finish line when they came across in 1989 was one of the most profoundly moving experiences of my life,” says Reilly. The book provides answers to common questions including the one he gets asked most often: “How can you keep doing this without growing complacent?” Reilly has called over 400,000 athletes across Ironman finish lines and hundreds of thousands more in other events. He’s been inducted in the Ironman Hall of Fame, the USA Triathlon Hall of Fame and the Running USA Hall of Champions. And he says he couldn’t get complacent if he did this for another 200 years.

While announcing races around the world for so long, Reilly has seen many technological changes in the logistics and recalls times when things did not go according to plan. These back stories are enlightening, amusing and illustrate the full range of responsibilities that come with the job.

There’s much more to it than showing up on race day. “As with every announcer, my race starts about seven to 10 days before the actual event,” he writes. “One of the most important things I do is read every athlete’s name and their personal stories.” Not just once, but five or six times, so he remembers the details when they finish. “If there aren’t too many other athletes coming through at the same time,” he explains, “I can take a few seconds to fill the spectators in, which makes for a richer experience for everybody.”

Reilly highlights some of those athlete stories and it would be surprising if readers aren’t reaching for tissues at some point. Before they even get to the gruelling races, these amazing people conquer incredible odds, suffer terrible losses, and refuse to let illness and setbacks detour their Ironman goals. It is clear that Reilly deeply respects all of them. “Ironman isn’t just something you do; it’s something you become,” he writes.

“There is not a doubt in my mind that being an Ironman race announcer is what I was born for,” he writes. “It’s the perfect fit for my skills and temperament and, aside from being with my family, I’m never happier than when I’m on the mic shepherding athletes through their race and welcoming them home when their day is done.”

He doesn’t like to take breaks and miss declaring any racers, but sometimes it does happen. On occasion, Reilly has heard of the deep disappointment of those who were missed and has found ways to make it up to them.

“Letters, email and phone calls with athletes all over the world have driven home for me that Ironman is not just a race,” he writes, “And announcing it is not just a job.”

You can purchase the book at https://mikereilly.net/findingmyvoice/

The post Mike Reilly’s book: Finding My Voice appeared first on Triathlon Magazine Canada.

RECIPE: A Triathlete’s Pizza

Triathlon Magazine Canada 1 month 23 hours ago

Pasta is likely the most glorified pre-race meal. It’s the one that gets all of the attention for being a brilliant carb-loading food. Though this may be true, pasta bowls can get boring. There is however another famous Italian dish that’s just as good, if not better.

Margherita Neapolitan style pizza with buffalo mozzarella, tomato sauce and basil.

Pizza is an excellent meal option. Frozen store-bought boxes or Americanized pizzas certainly fall under the unhealthy category, but a traditional Neapolitan thin-crust pizza can be just as nutritious as a big bowl of pasta.

Simplicity is key when adorning these bubbly crusts. The classic Margherita pizza is simply tomato sauce, mozzarella cheese, cherry tomatoes and fresh basil. A minimal amount of fresh ingredients can give enough punch to the flavour palate so that it feels like there’s way more going on than what’s presented.

While pizza may take a little extra ahead-of-time planning, the actual baking time is short. Making the dough a day in advance allows it to rise slowly and create beautiful bubbles that make the light and crispy crust of a Neapolitan pizza. Once risen, all that’s left to do is shape and fill the pizza with whatever toppings you desire. Here are a few of our favourite combinations:

BBQ Chicken Pizza: Chicken breast (cooked and cut into small pieces), Bacon (cooked and crumbled BBQ sauce), Old cheddar cheese, grated Red onion (sliced thinly)

Prosciutto and Arugula Pizza: Prosciutto, Pesto (homemade or store-bought Fresh arugula), Asiago cheese (flaked), Olive oil to drizzle

Classic Margherita Pizza: Tomato sauce, Fresh mozzarella (sliced Cherry tomatoes), halved Fresh basil to garnish

Andouille Sausage Pizza: Tomato sauce, Andouille sausage (sliced), sliced and cooked Mushroom, Fresh mozzarella cheese (grated)

Classic Pizza Dough

Ingredients

  • 500 g all-purpose flour, plus more for shaping the dough
  • 8 g fine sea salt
  • 1 g active dry yeast
  • 350 g water, about 1 1⁄2 cups

Directions

  1. In a medium bowl, thoroughly blend the flour, yeast and salt. Add the water and, with a wooden spoon and/ or your hands, mix thoroughly. It’s easiest to start with the spoon, then switch to your hands.
  2. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap or a kitchen towel and allow it to rise at room temperature for 18 hours or until it has more than doubled. It will take longer in a chilly room and less time in a very warm one.
  3. Flour a work surface and scrape out the dough. Divide it into 4 equal parts and shape them.
  4. For each portion, start with the right side of the dough and pull it toward the centre, then do the same with the left, then the top, then the bottom (the order doesn’t actually matter; what you want is four folds). Shape each portion into a round and turn seam-side down. Mould the dough into a neat circular mound. The mounds should not be sticky; if they are, dust with more flour.
  5. Once ready to bake, place the pizza stone in the oven, so it is about 20 cm from the broiler. Preheat the oven on bake at 500 F for at least 30 minutes.
  6. Take one ball of dough and generously flour it in your hand, and the work surface. Gently press down and stretch the ball of dough out to 25–30 cm. Don’t worry if it’s not round. Don’t handle it more than necessary; you want some of the gas bubbles to remain in the dough. It should look slightly blistered.
  7. Flour and place some cornmeal on a pizza peel (or an unrimmed baking sheet) and lay the disk of dough onto the centre. Then, spoon sauce over the surface and spread it evenly, leaving about an inch of the rim untouched. It is now ready to be topped with your favourite pizza toppings and cheese.
  8. The oven should be pre-heated to 500 F by this time. Now, set your oven to the highest setting it can go, about 550 F, if possible. Always keep an eye during the baking process and be aware of smoke levels. Do not leave pizza baking unattended.
  9. With quick, jerking motions, slide the pizza off the pan onto the stone. Bake for anywhere between 5–10 minutes depending on your oven’s abilities, the top should be bubbling and the crust starting to brown nicely.
  10. Remove, cut and serve immediately.

The post RECIPE: A Triathlete’s Pizza appeared first on Triathlon Magazine Canada.

5 tips for spring riding

Triathlon Magazine Canada 1 month 1 day ago

It is officially spring. Depending on what part of Canada you find yourself in, it may take a couple more weeks before the spring thaw takes effect, but it’s time to get your bike ready because you’ve been prepared to get off the trainer for the past two weeks.

Related: 8 tips for your spring bike tune-up

Here are five tips you can use to prepare for your spring rides:

Spring is here!

1) Have your gear ready to go

From your bike to kit, make sure everything is in working order and all lined up for a day (morning or evening) on the road. Being prepared is the first step to making sure you get out for your early season rides.

2) Have a route planned

Knowing the route you will be riding is a great way to have something to look forward too. Whether it’s a route that sets you up for multiple King of the Mountain (KOM) attempts on Strava, has nice flat sections to get into the TT position or includes a bit of gravel, new routes can help you get outside.

Boucle 5K (Triathlon Int. Mtl) 2017

Related: How to be a triathlete on Strava

3) Make it a social ride

Once the weather begins to warm up, clubs and groups will start their weekly rides. Joining a training group is a great way to get ready for the triathlon season and meet new people. Plus, with the group, you can take over the entire cafe or bar at the end of your ride.

Coffee rides in North Carolina.

Related: Five training groups across Canada

4) Eat light before heading out

Whether you plan to ride first thing in the morning or the evening before supper, sitting down for a full meal can derail your riding plan. Have a snack ready to go before hopping on your bike. After, you can chow down on a bigger meal.

Related: Fasted workouts part of a periodized nutritional approach

5) Make it a habit

It takes a couple of weeks before routines start to become solidified, so it’s important to stick with it. Besides, outdoor riding is so much more enjoyable than the trainer.

A version of this story is on Canadian Cycling Magazine.

The post 5 tips for spring riding appeared first on Triathlon Magazine Canada.

Cervélo P3X: It‘ Personal!

Tritime 1 month 1 day ago

Am 4. März präsentierte Cervélo Cycles in Arizona ausgewählten Journalisten das Triathlon-Zeitfahrrad P3X, das auf Basis des P5X weiterentwickelt wurde. Cervélo umschreibt es folgendermaßen: „The P3X will drive more of you to push your limits and reach your personal best.“

 
Wie beim P5X brauchten sich die Designer des Triathlon-Zeitfahrrades P3X nicht an die im Straßenradsport einzuhaltenden UCI-Rahmen-Boxen halten. Aufgrund der beim „großen Bruder“ gesammelten Erfahrungen sollten beim P3X nicht nur die neuesten Entwicklungsstandards berücksichtigt werden, es sollte auch viel leichter sein. Letzteres wurde mit einem um 16 Prozent leichteren Rahmen-Set erreicht. Darüber hinaus wurde auch das Gewicht von Lenker (13%), Sattelstütze (22%), Nutrition-Storage am Lenkkopf (43%) und der Aero-Bars (8%) reduziert. Die Tretlager- und Lenkkopf-Steifigkeiten erhöhten sich gegenüber dem P5X um 8 Prozent (Lenkkopf) beziehungsweise 15 Prozent (Tretlager).
Übernommen wurde die stufenlose Höhenverstellbarkeit des Auflegers, vergleichbar mit den Einstellmöglichkeiten eines Sattelrohrs. Spacer werden nicht mehr benötigt. Der 400 Millimeter breite Basislenker kann zur besseren Erreichbarkeit der Bremsen an den Ausfallenden um bis zu zwei Zentimeter gekürzt werden. Die Armauflagen können ebenfalls individuell positioniert werden, jedoch liegen die Unterarme vergleichsweise eng beieinander. Der Triathlet kann bei den Extensions den Winkel in 5er-Schritten von waagerecht bis 15o (nach oben) adjustieren.
Wie beim in der vergangenen Woche präsentierten neuen P5 setzt Cervélo bei der Klemmung der Laufräder des P3X auf die im Mountainbike-Sektor gängige Steckachsen-Technologie. Scheibenbremsen – ein Rahmen-Gabel-Set für klassische Felgenbremsen wird nicht unterstützt –, die bei allen Witterungsbedingungen ein optimales Bremsverhalten garantieren, runden das neue P3X ab.
 

Ausstattungsvarianten Cervélo P3X
Cervélo bietet folgende beiden Ausstattungsvarianten an:
P3X Ultegra Di2 2.0: 7.999 Euro

P3X Ultegra Di2: 9.999 Euro

Bereits zwei Wochen vor der offiziellen Präsentation durfte die tritime-Redaktion das neue P3X bei einer mehrstündigen Testausfahrt unter die Lupe nehmen. Einen ersten  Testbericht werden wir zeitnah an dieser Stelle veröffentlichen.
weitere Informationen
Text: Klaus Arendt
Fotos: Cervélo Cycles
Am 4. März präsentierte Cervélo Cycles in Arizona ausgewählten Journalisten das Triathlon-Zeitfahrrad P3X, das auf Basis des P5X weiterentwickelt wurde. Cervélo umschreibt es folgendermaßen: „The P3X will drive more of you to push your limits and reach your personal best.“

 
Wie beim P5X brauchten sich die Designer des Triathlon-Zeitfahrrades P3X nicht an die im Straßenradsport einzuhaltenden UCI-Rahmen-Boxen halten. Aufgrund der beim „großen Bruder“ gesammelten Erfahrungen sollten beim P3X nicht nur die neuesten Entwicklungsstandards berücksichtigt werden, es sollte auch viel leichter sein. Letzteres wurde mit einem um 16 Prozent leichteren Rahmen-Set erreicht. Darüber hinaus wurde auch das Gewicht von Lenker (13%), Sattelstütze (22%), Nutrition-Storage am Lenkkopf (43%) und der Aero-Bars (8%) reduziert. Die Tretlager- und Lenkkopf-Steifigkeiten erhöhten sich gegenüber dem P5X um 8 Prozent (Lenkkopf) beziehungsweise 15 Prozent (Tretlager).
Übernommen wurde die stufenlose Höhenverstellbarkeit des Auflegers, vergleichbar mit den Einstellmöglichkeiten eines Sattelrohrs. Spacer werden nicht mehr benötigt. Der 400 Millimeter breite Basislenker kann zur besseren Erreichbarkeit der Bremsen an den Ausfallenden um bis zu zwei Zentimeter gekürzt werden. Die Armauflagen können ebenfalls individuell positioniert werden, jedoch liegen die Unterarme vergleichsweise eng beieinander. Der Triathlet kann bei den Extensions den Winkel in 5er-Schritten von waagerecht bis 15o (nach oben) adjustieren.
Wie beim in der vergangenen Woche präsentierten neuen P5 setzt Cervélo bei der Klemmung der Laufräder des P3X auf die im Mountainbike-Sektor gängige Steckachsen-Technologie. Scheibenbremsen – ein Rahmen-Gabel-Set für klassische Felgenbremsen wird nicht unterstützt –, die bei allen Witterungsbedingungen ein optimales Bremsverhalten garantieren, runden das neue P3X ab.
 

Ausstattungsvarianten Cervélo P3X
Cervélo bietet folgende beiden Ausstattungsvarianten an:
P3X Ultegra Di2 2.0: 7.999 Euro

P3X Ultegra Di2: 9.999 Euro

Bereits zwei Wochen vor der offiziellen Präsentation durfte die tritime-Redaktion das neue P3X bei einer mehrstündigen Testausfahrt unter die Lupe nehmen. Einen ersten  Testbericht werden wir zeitnah an dieser Stelle veröffentlichen.
weitere Informationen
Text: Klaus Arendt
Fotos: Cervélo Cycles

Der Beitrag Cervélo P3X: It‘ Personal! erschien zuerst auf tritime - Leidenschaft verbindet.

Cervélo launches the new P3X

Triathlon Magazine Canada 1 month 1 day ago

When Cervélo launched the P5X a few years ago, we applauded the new bike as a new breakthrough in innovations to tri-bike engineering.

“This was the logical step for Cervélo,” I told one of the company’s founders, Phil White, when I saw him in Kona a few days after the bike was launched. “It’s not about how fast the bike is. It’s not about how fast the bike and the rider combined is. It’s a look at the bike, the rider and all the crap triathletes need to carry to get through an Ironman.”

Cervélo’s new P3X.

That’s what the P5X was all about. Lesley Loughlin, Cervélo’s marketing manager for triathlon, had spent years working on the engineers at the company, begging them to come to races to see how triathletes were using their bikes. They listened and, like any self-respecting engineer would, moved to overkill mode, taking thousands of pictures of triathletes riding their bikes at full and half-distance races, then analyzing exactly what those riders were carrying with them.

They quickly realized that full-distance competitors liked to carry three round water bottles. They needed space for gels, bars, a spare tube and a CO2 cartridge. They realized (often in horror) that the super-aero bikes they were designing were being slowed down with all kinds of stuff being taped and bolted all over.

Which led to the P5X, a bike that was as aero as anything else out there with three round water bottles on it, along with a bunch of gels, bars, that spare tube and cartridge. Heck, there was even space for a spare jacket or vest.

You can read our review of the P5X here – suffice it to say it took a while, eventually we came to quite like the P5X, but wished it was lighter and a bit more responsive.

Related: Cervélo P5X

The folks at Cervélo were listening. (OK, we probably weren’t the only people who felt that way, but we’ll take full credit none-the-less.) Meet the new P3X, which offers almost all of the innovative features we saw in the P5X, but is noticeably lighter and stiffer in just the right spots to provide a much more responsive ride.

Innovations from P5X

So, like the P5X, the new P3X can easily carry three round water bottles without compromising its aero characteristics. You get the same innovative riser system for the aero extensions, but the new design is simpler. You can angle the bars in four positions – 0, 5, 10 and 15 degrees – to dial in the perfect aero position. The base bar is a similar shape, but rather than the two-piece base bar that bolted in place on the P5X you get a one-piece base bar. Like the newly announced P5, the base bar has some Cervélo-branded grips that are very comfortable and seem to provide excellent grip even as your hands get sweaty.

The between the arms water bottle cage at the front is now removable if you decide you don’t want that feature, while the bento box remains the same size, but has been modified – there’s no zip on the new version. There’s still a seat-post mounted water bottle cage, along with the option of putting one on the downtube, too.

Subtle changes

The new P3X is being manufactured at Cervélo’s own facility in Asia, versus at the Hed facility in the USA. This is no-doubt one of the factors in the decreased cost of the new bike. The frame has been modified slightly, but looks very similar to the P5X. The thinner down tube now features an external flat storage kit that sits just behind the front wheel. There’s a new seat post that is considerably lighter than that on the P5X.

Overall the bike is stiffer than the P5X – eight percent stiffer at the head tube and 15 percent stiffer at the bottom bracket. It’s also lighter – 16 percent (254 grams) lighter than the P5X.

That stiffness and weight loss makes for a noticeably improved feel while riding (more on that in a minute), but you do lose a tiny bit of aerodynamics with the P3X – 17 g to 27 g more drag, depending on your set up, according to the folks at Cervélo.

The ride

You notice the improved ride and how much lighter the new bike is as soon as you get on the new P3X and start pedaling. It’s that marked a difference. Climbing is much more comfortable on the new bike and it is noticeably more responsive in and out of corners. That new improved feel doesn’t seem to come with any comfort cost, at all. The bike still offers an extremely smooth ride and you can dial in a super-aero position (the most important component to a fast ride), just as you could on the P5X. And, with 36 mm of wheel clearance, you can easily accommodate even a 28 mm tire and still have 4 mm clearance, so you can be even more sure of a comfortable ride on the new frame. As with the P5X, the disc brakes offer outstanding braking in virtually any conditions.

Two rides on the bike are hardly enough to be able to make any comments on just how much of an aero penalty you’ll face on the new P3X compared to the P5X, but from what we could see it’s hard to imagine there’s much there. Overall it just feels like a marked improvement on the P5X. I couldn’t imagine a faster bike than the P5X for a bike course like one along the Queen K for the Ironman World Championship. With the P3X the list of perfect courses suddenly got considerably bigger – I can’t imagine why you wouldn’t look at this bike for virtually any full-distance course out there. If you have to carry lots of fuel with you in a race, this bike makes a lot of sense.

A complete arsenal

The addition of the P3X to Cervelo’s line up along with the announcement of the new P5 last week very much puts Cervélo back in the spotlight when it comes to triathlon bikes these days. More experienced riders who like a super-responsive bike and don’t carry a lot with them will likely gravitate towards the P5. Those who are planning on hitting the full-distance race scene with a vengeance will want to have a very good look at the P3X, a bike that now offers virtually all of the innovative benefits we saw on the P5X, but in a much lighter and more responsive package. Add in the fact that it also comes at a significantly lower cost and you have a trifecta of bonus features in the P3X.

Related: Cervélo’s New P5

Builds

The P3X will be available in a couple of different packages. The P3X Ultegra Di2 version ships with, of course, Shimano’s Ultegra Di2 gruppo and DT Swiss ARC 1450 48/62 wheels and will retail for $11,500. The P3X Ultegra Di2 2.0 version has the same gruppo, but comes with DT Swiss P1800 wheels. Both models come with various Cervélo branded storage boxes – the SmartPak 600, the Speedcase 600, the Stealthbox 300 and the rear hydration mount.

The post Cervélo launches the new P3X appeared first on Triathlon Magazine Canada.

5 conseils pour s’entraîner sans entraîneur

Triathlon Magazine Canada 1 month 1 day ago

De nos jours, il y a de nombreuses ressources disponibles pour s’entraîner pour un triathlon ou autre évènement sportif sans avoir recours à un entraîneur. Il existe des plans d’entraînement généraux adaptés pour différents niveaux de fitness et d’expérience. De plus, il existe de nombreux podcasts et chaînes Youtube qui partagent des conseils pour les triathlètes novices. Par exemple, Triathlon Taren (chaîne Youtube et podcast) est une excellente source d’information pour les gens qui débutent en triathlon. J’essaie aussi de partager mes connaissances via mes articles sur triathlon magazine canada (comme celui-ci!), mon podcast (Le podcast du triathlète) et à l’occasion, quelques vidéos. Il existe également plusieurs livres destinés aux nouveaux adeptes du triathlon.

Related: 10 podcasts à écouter

Personnellement, j’ai tenté de m’entraîner par moi-même à quelques reprises et j’ai vite réalisé que j’avais besoin d’un entraîneur pour m’encadrer. Photo: Talbot Cox.

Par contre, malgré l’importante quantité de ressources disponibles, il est quand même difficile de s’entraîner par soi-même sans avoir recours à un entraîneur. Personnellement, j’ai tenté de m’entraîner par moi-même à quelques reprises et j’ai vite réalisé que j’avais besoin d’un entraîneur pour m’encadrer. J’ai réalisé que j’avais tendance à prioriser le type de séance que j’aime particulièrement, telles que les longues courses en trail et les longues sorties de vélo et à négliger les séances très courtes et intenses. Étant un « diesel », soit un athlète qui performe bien sur un effort très long mais pas sur des efforts courts et intenses, j’avais tendance à seulement travailler mon système aérobie et à délaisser les efforts anaérobiques. Également, étant une personne intense et parfois obsessive (comme la majorité des triathlètes!), j’avais tendance à trop m’entraîner ou à m’entraîner lorsque j’étais malade ou blessé. J’avais aussi de la difficulté à planifier mon entraînement pour une longue période de temps, par exemple pour une année complète, et je planifiais plutôt mes entraînements de jour en jour ou de semaine en semaine.

Lionel Sanders s’est également confié dans un récent vidéo qu’il avait de la difficulté à planifier son entraînement à long terme et décidait plutôt le matin même quelle séance il désirait faire. Maintenant, avec l’aide de plusieurs entraîneurs il a une meilleure vue d’ensemble de sa progression annuelle.

Related: Lionel Sanders hints at 2019 season debut

Lionel Sanders at the 2018 Ironman World Championships

Je crois tout de même que c’est possible d’avoir du succès en s’entraînant sans entraîneur, particulièrement à un niveau non-compétitif. Voici quelques conseils pour vous aider à planifier votre propre plan d’entraînement.

1) Déterminez clairement vos objectifs pour l’année durant la saison morte afin de planifier votre saison d’entraînement et de compétition en conséquence

Sans objectif précis, il est difficile de planifier votre entraînement pour l’année. Si par exemple, votre objectif est de compléter votre premier Ironman en août vous devez planifier votre entraînement en conséquence afin d’être prêt le jour J. Vous pouvez donc inclure quelques triathlons de préparation dans votre calendrier en début d’été et quelques semaines avec l’Ironman pour tester votre niveau de forme.

2) Demandez des conseils à des triathlètes plus expérimentés ou à des entraîneurs.

Les triathlètes aiment s’entraider et partager leur expérience, donc n’hésitez pas à demander des conseils. Vous éviterez ainsi de faire les mêmes erreurs que ces personnes ont fait lors de leurs premiers triathlons.

Photo: Melanie McQuaid

3) Planifiez votre plan d’entraînement en vous imaginant que vous planifiez le plan d’entraînement pour une autre personne.

Ce que j’ai réalisé quand je m’entraînais par moi-même est que je prenais des décisions irrationnelles quand je planifiais mon propre plan d’entraînement mais que j’étais beaucoup plus rationnel quand le planifiais l’entraînement des athlètes que j’entraîne. Par exemple, si votre ami vous demande s’il devrait s’entraîner malgré qu’il ait une douleur au tibia quand il court, vous lui direz : Prends quelques jours de repos ou Remplace ton entraînement de course à pied par du vélo et d’ici quelques jours la douleur va diminuer et tu pourras courir. Par contre, si vous avez une douleur à un tibia, il est fort probable que vous allez tout de même courir. Quand c’est notre propre entraînement, on est trop émotif par rapport à nos objectifs et nos rêves sportifs que l’on agit pas de façon rationnelle.

TrainerRoad coaching

4) Ne pas croire tout ce qui est écrit dans les magazines et les sites internet

À chaque semaine, il semble y a avoir une nouvelle diète ou un nouveau gadget révolutionnaire. Il est donc très difficile de savoir quoi acheter comme équipement, quoi manger et comment s’entraîner. Plutôt que d’être influencé par les diètes, entraînements et gadgets tendances, il est mieux de retourner à la base : avoir un mixte d’entraînements à base intensité et quelques entraînements d’intervalles, bien manger et bien dormir. Si vous débutez en triathlon, vous êtes bombardé par plein d’information donc il est préférable de simplifier votre entraînement pour vous permettre de bien débuter votre programme sans être trop confus. Pourquoi faire compliqué quand on peut faire simple!

5) Avoir un partenaire qui nous tient responsable (« an accountability partner »)

Related: Five training groups across Canada

Lorsque l’on s’entraîne par soi-même, on n’a pas d’entraîneur pour nous réprimander si on n’a pas fait nos entraînements, nos exercices de physio ou nos étirements. C’est donc facile de se dire : « je vais les faire plus tard » ou « ce n’est pas si grave si je ne fais pas mes exercices de physio cette semaine ». À force de reporter au lendemain, il y a de grandes chances que l’on ne fasse jamais nos exercices. Il est donc important d’avoir quelqu’un qui connaît nos objectifs et ce que l’on doit faire pour atteindre ces objectifs. Cette personne est là pour vous garder sur la bonne voie et pour vous aider à atteindre vos objectifs sportifs.

The post 5 conseils pour s’entraîner sans entraîneur appeared first on Triathlon Magazine Canada.

Fresh kicks for spring

Triathlon Magazine Canada 1 month 1 day ago

The birds are chirping, the ice is melting and the temperatures are rising – spring is here! Each day we get closer and closer to summer, and after a long winter of running on ice, salt and snow, it’s time to treat yourself with some new shoes. Here are four running shoes for spring:

Hoka One One Clifton 5 

  • Shoe Category: Neutral
  • Weight: 265 grams (men’s nine)
  • Drop: 5mm
  • Price: $170.00
HOKA ONE ONE Clifton 5

Known in the running community for its cushioning and lightweight features, the Clifton is ideal for those looking for a durable shoe that offers comfort for their long runs but is light enough to race in. The latest edition of the Clifton keeps its famed midsole geometry and delivers cushioning you can feel. I would describe it as running on a cloud. What makes the Clifton 5 midsole so soft and responsive is the EVA foam and meta-rocker geometry. Continue Reading: The Hoka One One Clifton 5 Review

Saucony Kinvara 10

  • Shoe Category: Neutral
  • Weight: 190 grams
  • Drop: 4 mm
  • Cushion: Responsive
  • Price: $110.00

The original Saucony Kinvara wasn’t the first shoe to be billed as a lightweight trainer, but to me, it was the shoe that truly revolutionized the category. It’s the perfect triathlon shoe – light enough and easy enough to turn over so you could run fast if needed, but also with enough support and cushioning to get you through a half- or full-distance run with ease. The latest version, the Kinvara 10, more than lives up to that reputation. Continue Reading: The Saucony Kinvara 10 Review

361 Degrees Meraki 2 

  • Shoe Category: neutral cushioning
  • Drop: 9 mm
  • Weight: 250 grams (men’s), 225 grams (women’s)
  • Price: $169.99

Meraki is Greek for the soul or creativity you put into a task – kind of like the soul you put into running and triathlon. In its second edition, the Meraki shoe retains its combination of cushioning and responsiveness provided by 361’s QU!KFOAM midsole material. For heel-strikers who like a lot of cushioning under the heel, the shoe has a 9 mm drop. The Meraki 2 keeps most of its defining features, including its thin tongue, molded heel counter and the outsole’s carbon fibre plate. Flex grooves in the forefoot outsole mimic the foot’s natural motion at toe-off, providing both traction and acceleration. Continue Reading: The 361 Meraki 2 Review

Nike Zoom Fly FK

  • Shoe Category: Racing Flat
  • Drop: 10 mm
  • Weight: 235 grams
  • Price: $215

The shoe combines the Flyknit upper that Nike wearers have come to love, with the durable React foam. On top of that, they slid in the full-length carbon-fibre plate found in the Zoom Vaporfly 4%.

On the track, the shoes still felt responsive despite the softer surface, and on the road, there was a noticeable amount of pop. This shoe wants to push you forward. I wouldn’t recommend this shoe on an easy day or recovery day, as this is not an all-around trainer. The Zoom Fly is designed to help you through your faster workouts. Continue Reading: The Nike Zoom Fly FK Review

 

The post Fresh kicks for spring appeared first on Triathlon Magazine Canada.

Sélection Championnat du Monde Duathlon : Les élus sont …

Trimes 1 month 2 days ago
La sélection pour les Championnats du Monde de Duathlon est tombée ! Rappelons que ce championnat aura lieu à Pontevedra le 27 Avril en Espagne sur le format 10 km – 40 km – 5 km. Chez les femmes  L’Équipe de France sera donc composée de 3 athlètes : Garance Blaut (Stade Français)Marion Legrand (Stade Français)Sandra Levenez…

5 workouts to help you run a faster 5K

Triathlon Magazine Canada 1 month 2 days ago

Spring represents hope for triathletes. The long Canadian winter is over, and summer is on its way. Shorter road races such as a 5K are perfect events to test your fitness and get you in the racing mindset.

Karsten Madsen running at the Runner’s Den Pancake 5K in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Related: Break out of winter with a 5K road race

Training for a short road race takes less time than a half-marathon, and it means faster workouts that develop speed and strength. Also, having a race to train for before the triathlon season gives your training focus.

Jessey the Elf ran the 5K at Around the Bay in 16:59.

The following are five workouts that will set yourself up for a fast 5K.

Workout 1

  • 5 x 1,000m at goal race pace with 400m slow jog recovery

Workout 2

  • 10 x 400m at 10 seconds/K faster than race pace with 200m slow jog recovery

Workout 3

  • 4 x 1,200m at 5-8 seconds/K faster than race pace with equal recovery passive rest

Workout 4

  • 3 x 1,600m at race pace with 90 seconds rest + 1K at race pace

Workout 5 (pre-race: a week out)

  • 2 x 2K at 5K pace + 5 seconds/K with 400m jog recovery
  • 3 x 800m at 5 seconds/K faster than race pace with 90 seconds rest
  • 4x 400m at 10 seconds/K faster than race pace with 200m jog recovery

Related: Activation drills for triathletes

Remember to begin each workout with a warm-up consisting of 10-15 minutes of very easy running. Include a few minutes for dynamic drills, stretches, activation and strides. Following the workout, cool down with 5-15 minutes of easy running.

The post 5 workouts to help you run a faster 5K appeared first on Triathlon Magazine Canada.

21 athletes linked to German doctor doping scandal

Triathlon Magazine Canada 1 month 2 days ago

On Wednesday, as reported by the BBC, Munich’s state prosecutor Kai Graeber said the 21 athletes tied to the doping scandal are from three winter and two summer sports from 2011 to 2019. “There are three-figure cases of blood being taken out and then being reintroduced worldwide, in Germany, Austria, Italy, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Croatia, Slovenia and Hawaii,” Graeber said.

The scandal began following the 2019 Nordic World Ski Championships in February, where one Kazakh, two Austrian and two Estonian athletes where arrested. Austrian police say the alleged doping ring was based in Erfurt, Germany, and it’s “strongly suspected of carrying out blood doping of elite athletes in order to improve their performances in national and international competitions and to gain illegal profit from this.”

The investigation is currently ongoing, and no details on the names of the athletes or their sports are available at this time.

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